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General Edward C. Betts (1890-1946) He was 56 when he died. 

General Edward C. Betts was Judge Advocate European Theatre of Operations from 1942-1946. 
(S) Betts, Edward C., USA - Awarded: DSM-A - Distinguished Service Medal (DSM)  the A stands for the Air Force. He was given this award because he was a very important man at this time and all the things he did payed off for the war so they chose to give him the DSM-A award.
 
What is a Judge Advocate?
 
A judge advocate is a military officer with legal training. He has different duties such as giving advice on legal matters to a group of officers sitting as a court-martial and acting as the prosecutor of the accused serviceman or woman. A judge advocate also holds the responsibility to protect the accused from any improprieties which might incriminate the accused in violation of the constitution.
 

In October 1945 Edward C. Betts wrote this letter to Justice Jackson.
 
 

In This document, General Betts appeals to Justice Jackson for his cooperation and advice in formulating a plan to address the problems inherent in complying with the directive, particularly its terms for the trial of the cases of membership in criminal organizations and the treatment of persons now held in custody awaiting such trial.

 

Betts was one of Eisenhower's close advisors and Eisenhower asked him to ask Jackson to follow the procedures mentioned in the letter. At the top of the 2nd page he is saying that Jackson has formed a good group of people to work on these issues and that they need to a good job with keeping the public happy while completing these demands/requests, and that they have already done that so far.Page 3 talks about the points of the paper and how it reflects in the views of the headquarters and what there

discussion is going to be about. He tells that he is going to present this document early in the next week. 

 

The solution, that General Betts's wants to do, is to have the existing Office of U.S. Chief of Counsel assume prosecutorial responsibility for the cases against members of criminal Nazi organizations, and other Nazi war criminals not included in the main trial before the International Military Tribunal. These additional cases would be tried before Military Government Courts established within the United States Occupational Zone;the formation of such courts would wait upon an extension of Executive Order 9547, in Betts's view. 

 

The alternative is the appointment for a Special Prosecutor for Nazi Crimes, whose office would gradually absorb a portion of current OCC personnel in order to utilize their knowledge, and experience in gathering and deploying evidence related to the prosecution of war crimes. Betts goes on to speculate about the appointment process for such a prosecutor, his level, or status within the military government,and the authority necessary to accomplish his mission. "This document is a typewritten carbon copy of good quality on thin, slightly browning paper".

Many sentences and phrases of this text have been underlined in pencil.The notation, appears in the top margin of page 2, directly over "JCS 1023/10," which has been underlined in the text as well as linked to the notation with an arrow. All of these markings are handwritten in pencil. 

 

In August 1945 General Eisenhowers  quarters had Edward C. Betts, look over and be responsible of the " effective application" of J.C.S 1023/10and a month later General Betts approved a memorandum by Colonel Charles Fairman embodying recommendations for the execution of the directive. General Betts and Colonel Fairman, and the Legal Ad-agree that, in planning for the execution of the directive, Mr. Jackson organization should be utilized as an administration of base operations and a future source of personnel and that there needs to be someone to take charge of the project. Soon after General Betts went onto Washington to show these recommendations to the right authorities. They met with the generals approval, and on 16 January 1946 President Truman signed the Executive Order No. 9679 embodying the proposals described. 

 

General Betts returned to the United States in late February so that he could recruit a staff. This showed a difficult undertaking by, the end of March 1946 35 attorneys had been engaged and while this was a large group by no means it was reasonably adequate. In other news other problems had been settled and on 29 March 1946, Mr. Justice Jackson announced an appointment by himself as Deputy Chief of Counsel, and directed Betts to prepare for the prosecution of war crimes charges other than people involved in the IMT trial. The Secretary of the Army stayed in Washington a few more weeks to continue recruitment, and returned to Nuernberg at the end of April 1946. 


What is a Judge Advocate?
 
A judge advocate is a military officer with legal training. He has different duties such as giving advice on legal matters to a group of officers sitting as a court-martial and acting as the prosecutor of the accused serviceman or woman. A judge advocate also holds the responsibility to protect the accused from any improprieties which might incriminate the accused in violation of the constitution. 


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Background
603 Franklin St. house is Grayson Sullins home. This house was built in 1901, this house was designed by Herbert Cowell for the Grayson family. A.M. Booth, a local contractor, was the builder. "Edward C. Betts, the author of "Early History of Huntsville, Alabama 1804 to 1870", and Judge Advocate-General to General Eisenhower, ETO, bought the house in 1919. It is currently owned by Dr. and Mrs. William H. Sullins".
 
Early History Of Huntsville, Alabama: 1804 To 1870 (1916) 
Edward Chambers Betts wrote this book it was published Feb 2009 it was published by Kessinger Publishing it is 128 pages and in English.

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Sources 
http://www.homeofheroes.com/verify/recipients_be.html
http://www.flipkart.com/early-history-huntsville-alabama-edward-book-1104050870
http://huntsville.about.com/od/historichomes/ss/weedenhomestour_4.htm
http://library2.lawschool.cornell.edu/Donovan/show.asp?id=437&query=
http://books.google.com/books?id=03AbQHoPvgsC&pg=PA5&lpg=PA5&dq=general+edward+c+betts&source=bl&ots=KB11JyHnCl&sig=zYoWWrUK75IRfXAqM08T_fQ5Sm8&hl=en&ei=oAz-S9e4GYG78ga4pombDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CDoQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=general%20edward%20c%20betts&f=false
http://www.gordon.army.mil/osja/history.htm